Reserve some glaze to drizzle over a Christmas-ham omelette, suggests Phil Wood. Photo: William Meppem Leftover food from Christmas Day is a thing of beauty … until you’re eating your 10th plain ham sandwich.
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But when you’re weary (or, let’s be honest, hungover) from the big celebrations, it’s hard to come up with ideas for using the remaining food.

Here’s some simple, not-so-cheffy inspiration from five chefs.

Benjamin Cooper, Chin Chin, Melbourne and Sydney”For Christmas lunch in our house, we do a spread of cold-cut meats and seafood so naturally sandwiches, salads and toasties go down a treat in the days following the feast.

“Prawn and zucchini pasta is an easy one to whip up, and a favourite of mine is a ham, cheese and mustard toastie.”

Massimo Mele, Catering By Massimo”We have a very multicultural Christmas. I have the big Italian family, my partner’s side is an Aussie family, and we have so much food. We always make a lasagne – trays of it – and more recently I’ve done some prawns to merge the two cultures together.

“We have to get creative with leftovers because of the kids. I’d be happy just reheating food from the day before but the kids get a bit picky.

“Leftovers are great for breakfast omelettes: put in some meat, leftover roast vegetables or greens. I make little crumbed fritters from the leftover vegies, too. I always have pizza bases in the freezer, and we roll them out, throw some leftovers on them and cook them up. And I keep the bones (from the ham or a roast meat) to make stock.”

Michael Ryan, Provenance, Beechworth”We don’t have the traditional Christmas meal. We have simple seafood and salads, nothing too heavy. I like to keep the use of leftovers simple, too. The last thing I want to do is cook too much or eat a heavy meal after a day or two of solid eating and drinking.

“I love ham sandwiches after Christmas Day; to me, they’re the pinnacle of Christmas leftovers. To use the meats in a more interesting way, you can put some leftover cooked meats in a banh mi. But I think the best way to deal with leftovers is to rethink how much food you have on the table in the first place. Christmas is known for being a decadent feast, but it’s a better idea to just cater to what you need. That way nothing is wasted.”

Tim Bourke,The Eateryat Maggie Beer’s farm, Barossa Valley Stuff cold roast meats into a bahn mi-style roll with pate, chilli and coriander. Photo: Kristoffer Paulsen

“I go back to Sydney for a week to spend Christmas with my family – and to cook the meals for them. We always have barbecued seafood, so we take a trip to the Sydney Fish Markets on Christmas Eve to get whatever’s fresh; it might be prawns or Moreton Bay bugs. Dad does the Christmas ham with his famous Guinness glaze, and Mum does the spuds.

“If there’s some leftover seafood, Mum cooks up some baked spuds in beef fat, which we eat with prawns and homemade cocktail sauce. That’s my ideal Boxing Day food. For dessert, it’s stonefruitand berries, either served with a lime granita or meringue. The leftover fruit is often used on top of a bircher muesli for breakfast the next morning.”

Crush leftover pavlova into an Eton mess. Photo: Marina Oliphant

Phil Wood, Point Leo Estate, Mornington Peninsula”I always have a ham, a few dozen oysters, roast chicken and pavlova on my Christmas table. Last year we had a crab curry, too.

“Any leftover roast vegetables are great in a vegie scramble or a frittata. Leftover bread is great in a bread and butter pudding.

“Christmas ham is great in an omelette. Chop it up and then use some of the glaze to glaze the omelette; that’s pretty spectacular.

“Leftover roast meat can be turned into a salad, and that’s often all you feel like after eating too much ham and drinking too much champagne on Christmas Day. Throw some chopped up roast turkey or chicken it in with some leafy greens and a light herb vinaigrette.

“If you have any pav left, you can make an Eton mess the next day. Just serve it with some fresh fruit, add more whipped cream and spoon some ice-cream into the middle.

“I often have leftover fruit, mangoes, cherries and berries, so we eat fruit with yoghurt and honey for lunches in the days after Christmas. That fruit is my favourite part of the festive food.”

Good Food

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After 24 days of family portraits, and fans analysing every one down the last pixel, the Kardashian-Jenners have given the world … a massive anticlimax.
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For more than three weeks, fans had been convinced that the family’s photographic advent calendar, featuring images of the extended clan in multiple groupings, would all lead to a Christmas announcement that its youngest adult, Kylie Jenner, is pregnant with her first child.

Where’s Kylie? The youngest Jenner has been missing from the family’s advent calendar, leading to heightened speculation she is pregnant. Photo: PA

The 20-year-old, who is dating rapper Travis Scott, is widely rumoured to be expecting, and, once confirmed, would be the third woman welcoming a baby in 2018; Kim and Kanye West are expecting their third child via a surrogate any week now, while her sister, Khloe, last week announced she is pregnant with her first child with her partner, Tristan Thompson.

While fans have been tallying up the tell-tale signs for weeks, they will have to wait just a little longer it seems. Here are five of the best. 1. She was absent from the advent calendar

While everyone from Rob Kardashian to Kendall Jenner, plus a plethora of kids from the clan, appeared in the shots posted each day through December on social media, Kylie Jenner has been conspicuously absent.

After Kim Kardashian West posted the December 25 image, fans were quick to express their disappointment. Picture this: it’s 2037. Nobody’s seen Kylie Jenner in 20 years. You’re still angry about the 25th day of Christmas. You’re life will never be complete.??? Sydnasty (@Sydneydara) December 26, 2017DAY 25 MERRY CHRISTMASA post shared by Kim Kardashian West (@kimkardashian) on Dec 25, 2017 at 4:47pm PSTMerry Christmas! Thank you @thelovemagazine @kegrand for this special cover shot by @kendalljenner & interview by @krisjenner #love19 ????A post shared by Kylie (@kyliejenner) on Dec 25, 2017 at 12:18pm PSTCongrats @kyliejenner on your @wwd Beauty Inc Award for Newsmaker of the Year!!! I am so proud of you and everything you’ve accomplished with @kyliecosmetics!! Thanks beauty @jordynwoods for accepting the award on Kylie’s behalf. You are both an inspiration!! #proudmama #wwd #beautyincawardsA post shared by Kris Jenner (@krisjenner) on Dec 7, 2017 at 8:54am PSTOkay so Kylie won Newsmaker of the Year at the Beauty Inc Awards and sent Jordyn to attend and accept the award on her behalf…. KYLIE JUST SAY YOUR PREGNANT ALREADY GODDAMN??? T???? (@tiff_nunes) December 7, 2017A post shared by Kylie (@kyliejenner) on Nov 22, 2017 at 10:55am PSTThank you so much #burtsbeesbaby @burtsbeesbaby #bbbfamjams for the most amazing collection of family jammies ever and i am obsessed with the plaid !!!!! Can’t wait to cuddle up with the kids #holidayseason thank you for a collection for every one of my grandchildren ?????? #blessed #grateful thanks for the idea @oprah !!A post shared by Kris Jenner (@krisjenner) on Nov 15, 2017 at 9:28am PSTThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.Read More →

Sydney to Hobart 2017: The start Black Jack moves ahead of LDV Comanche as they make their way past the Sydney Heads during the start of the 73rd Sydney to Hobart yacht race. Photo: AAP Image/David Moir
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Wild Oats X enters open water during the start of the Sydney Hobart yacht race. Photo: AP/Rick Rycroft

LDV Comanche, right, trails Wild Oats XI as they enter open water during the start of the Sydney Hobart yacht race. Photo: AP/Rick Rycroft

Black Jack at the start of the 73rd Sydney to Hobart yacht race. Photo: AAP Image/David Moir

Watsons Bay ahead of the start of the 73rd annual Sydney to Hobart yacht race. Photo: AAP /Brendan Esposito

Crew work to raise a sail on LDV Comanche. Photo: AP/Rick Rycroft

LDV Comanche (right) and Wild Oats XI narrowly miss each other as they tack outside the heads at the start of the 73rd annual Sydney to Hobart yacht race. Photo: AAP/Brendan Esposito

Supermaxi LDV Comanche enters open water during the start of the Sydney Hobart yacht race Sydney. Photo: AP/Rick Rycroft

Supermaxi Wild Oats XI enters open water during the start of the Sydney Hobart yacht race. Photo: AP/Rick Rycroft

The supermaxi Black Jack passes the heads of Sydney Harbour during the start of the Sydney Hobart yacht race. Photo: AP/Rick Rycroft

Crowds gather to watch the start of the Sydney to Hobart Race yacht race. Photo: Anna Kucera

Black Jack (front) and LDV Comanche (behind). Photo: Anna Kucera

Crowds gather to watch the start of the Sydney to Hobart yacht race. Photo: Anna Kucera

Crowds gather to watch the start of the Sydney to Hobart yacht race. Photo: Anna Kucera

Crowds gather to watch the start of the Sydney to Hobart yacht race. Photo: Anna Kucera

TweetFacebookSupermaxis LDV Comanche and Wild Oats XI have come dangerously close to colliding in the early stages of Tuesday’s 73rd Sydney to Hobart yacht race.

Comanche appeared to haveflown a protest flag aftera hair-raisingmanouevrefrom Wild Oats XI, which cut across her rival despiteComanchehaving right-of-way.

The race-favourite was not forced to alter course, which may save Wild Oats XI from receiving a time penalty for a dangerous manouevre.

Black Jack set the early tempo at the start of this year’sSydney to Hobart, leading eight-time winner Wild Oats XI out of the Sydney Heads.

Wild Oats XI started slowly for the second consecutive year but recovered to pass LDV Comanche, which had been side by side with Black Jack in the opening exchanges.

An easterly breeze made the early going tough for last year’s winner Infotrack, formerly Perpetual Loyal, who could only look on helplessly as the other three super maxis sped away.

Infotrack was fifth to turn out of the harbour behind Wild Oats X, the latter making her race debut.

It’s on: Black Jack, LDV Comanche and Wild Oats XI exiting Sydney Heads. Photo: James Brickwood

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Three people have died and two are in a critical condition after a crash on the Princes Highway south of Sussex Inlet.
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Emergency services were called to the scene 400 metres north of the Bendalong Road turn-off about 10.45am to reports of a head-on collision between two cars, an ambulance spokesman said. One of the cars was towing a caravan.

One of the vehicles burst into flames and three people from two separate cars died.

Paramedics treated two women for multiple serious injuries including possible head injuries, the ambulance spokesman said.

One woman was airlifted to Liverpool Hospital, and the second woman was airlifted to St George Hospital. Both were in a critical condition, police said.

Police closed all lanes of the Princes Highway but had reopened one lane at Bendalong by about 2.30pm.

On Tuesday evening all lanes at Bendalong had reopened, though traffic remains heavy with a southbound queue of about seven kilometres and northbound queue of about six kilometres.

Motorists are advised to allow plenty of extra travel time.

Police warned motorists the highway will remain partially closed for several hours, and urged them to use an alternative route or delay their travels to avoid the area.

Diversions are in place with motorists heading north requested to use the Kings Highway and Braidwood-Nowra Road and southbound traffic to take the Braidwood-Nowra Road and then Kings Highway.

Motorists can expect delays of two hours. Holiday road death toll double last year’s

The triple fatality comes after a horror holiday period on NSW roads.

There were 13 deaths by the end of Christmas Day, and another four by midday on Boxing Day alone, taking the holiday road toll to 17. In the same period last year, there were seven fatalities.

The Operation Safe Arrival road safety campaign runs from Friday December 15 to midnight on Monday January 1.

Now in its 12th day, Assistant Commissioner Michael Corboy, Commander of the Traffic and Highway Patrol Command said the death toll was “appalling”.

“That is more than one person a day which is quite alarming. It is just not good enough,” he said.

“NSW residents need to take some responsibility and realise that all it takes is one distraction and you could lose your life or kill a family travelling on the roads this holiday period.

“It is a time to be merry and enjoy spending time with your family and unfortunately day after day, police are left to pick up the pieces and deliver horrific messages to families.” BENDALONG: Princes Hwy remains closed near Bendalong Rd due to a fatal crash. A lengthy detour is in place and traffic’s very heavy approaching the crash site. pic.twitter南京夜网/IEHmne6odo??? Live Traffic NSW (@LiveTrafficNSW) December 26, 2017This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.Read More →

American actress Heather Menzies-Urich, who played one of the von Trapp children in the iconic 1965 filmThe Sound of Music, has died.
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Menzies-Urich was 68-years-old.

Menzies’ son Ryan Urich told US media his mother had been diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme about a month ago.

Glioblastoma is one of the most aggressive brain cancers; Urich said his mother’s health had decline rapidly in the wake of the diagnosis.

The Von Trapp children from The Sound of Music. Heather Menzies played Louisa, on the very left. Photo: Alamy

Urich, Menzies-Urich’s son by the actor Robert Urich, said his mother died surrounded by family at home in Canada.

“She was an actress, a ballerina and loved living her life to the fullest,” Urich said.

“She was not in any pain but, nearly four weeks after her diagnosis of terminal brain cancer, she had enough and took her last breath on this earth at 7.22pm.”

Heather Menzies (white jacket) with other Sound of Music cast members in 2005. Clockwise from top left are Charmian Carr (Liesl), Debbie Turner (Marta), Kym Karath (Gretl), Duane Chase (Kurt), Angela Cartwright (Brigitta), Julie Andrews (Maria von Trapp), Menzies and Nicholas Hammond (Freidrich). Photo: JULIE JACOBSON

Though Menzies-Urich had a diverse acting career, the role with which she remained associated her entire life was that of Louisa von Trapp, the 13-year-old daughter of Captain Georg​ von Trapp (Christopher Plummer) in the film adaptation ofThe Sound of Music.

In the film’s iconic scene where aspiring nun Maria (Julie Andrews) is introduced to her seven charges, Menzies-Urich’s Louisa is remembered for attempting to impersonate her younger sibling, Brigitta.

Heather Menzies-Urich, second from right, played Louisa von Trapp in The Sound Of Music. Photo: Supplied

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2017 Ashes MCG Test: Day 1 from Melbourne David Warner celebrates a Boxing Day century. Photo: AAP Image/Julian Smith
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David Warner celebrates a Boxing Day century. Photo: AAP Image/Julian Smith

David Warner celebrates a Boxing Day century. Photo: Wayne Ludbey

Dave Warner celebrates a Boxing Day ton. Photo: Justin McManus

James Anderson. Photo: AAP Image/Joe Castro

David Warner pulls Chris Woakes to bring up his fifty runs Picture:Wayne Ludbey

David Warner of Australia plays a shot on Day One of the Boxing Day Test match between Australia and England at the MCG in Melbourne, Tuesday, December 26, 2017. AAP Image/Joe Castro

Stuart Broad of England rests on his knees as he watches Cameron Bancroft of Australia run between the wickets on Day One of the Boxing Day Test match between Australia and England at the MCG in Melbourne, Tuesday, December 26, 2017. (AAP Image/Joe Castro)

Cameron Bancroft of Australia (right) plays a shot on Day One of the Boxing Day Test match between Australia and England at the MCG in Melbourne, Tuesday, December 26, 2017. (AAP Image/Joe Castro)

Cameron Bancroft of Australia defends a short ball on Day One of the Boxing Day test match between Australia and England at the MCG in Melbourne, Tuesday, December 26, 2017. (AAP Image/Julian Smith)

David Warner of Australia runs between the wickets on Day One of the Boxing Day Test match between Australia and England at the MCG in Melbourne, Tuesday, December 26, 2017. (AAP Image/Joe Castro)

Australia v England in the fourth Ashes test match at MCG. 26/12/2017 picture by Justin McManus. Fans enjoying the game

Australia v England in the fourth Ashes test match at MCG. 26/12/2017 picture by Justin McManus. Happy Santas.

Australia v England in the fourth Ashes test match at MCG. 26/12/2017 picture by Justin McManus. The English nights singing the national anthem.

Australia v England in the fourth Ashes test match at MCG. 26/12/2017 picture by Justin McManus. English fans in the festive spirit.

Australia v England in the fourth Ashes test match at MCG. 26/12/2017 picture by Justin McManus. Listerfield lifeguard.

David Warner of Australia plays a stroke on Day One of the Boxing Day test match between Australia and England at the MCG in Melbourne, Tuesday, December 26, 2017. (AAP Image/Julian Smith)

David Warner of Australia plays a shot on Day One of the Boxing Day Test match between Australia and England at the MCG in Melbourne, Tuesday, December 26, 2017. (AAP Image/Joe Castro)

David Warner of Australia plays a stroke on Day One of the Boxing Day test match between Australia and England at the MCG in Melbourne, Tuesday, December 26, 2017. (AAP Image/Julian Smith)

Fan enjoy the cricket on Day One of the Boxing Day test match between Australia and England at the MCG in Melbourne, Tuesday, December 26, 2017. (AAP Image/Joe Castro)

Cameron Bancroft of Australia (centre) plays a shot on Day One of the Boxing Day Test match between Australia and England at the MCG in Melbourne, Tuesday, December 26, 2017. (AAP Image/Joe Castro)

David Warner of Australia (left) reacts after reaching fifty runs on Day One of the Boxing Day test match between Australia and England at the MCG in Melbourne, Tuesday, December 26, 2017. (AAP Image/Julian Smith)

David Warner of Australia plays a shot on Day One of the Boxing Day Test match between Australia and England at the MCG in Melbourne, Tuesday, December 26, 2017. (AAP Image/Joe Castro)

David Warner of Australia plays a stroke on Day One of the Boxing Day test match between Australia and England at the MCG in Melbourne, Tuesday, December 26, 2017. (AAP Image/Julian Smith)

David Warner of Australia plays a stroke on Day One of the Boxing Day test match between Australia and England at the MCG in Melbourne, Tuesday, December 26, 2017. (AAP Image/Julian Smith)

TweetFacebookHANG ON! Warner isn’t going anywhere. AUS 1/129 pic.twitter南京夜网/pKtJG9wHuT

— Wide World of Sports (@wwos) December 26, 2017

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ROHINGYA INTERVIEWLaila Begum holds her son Mohammed Ifran??????s hand as he recieves treatment at the Red Cross Field Hospital in Kutupalong refugee camp. Mohammed only 40 days old, is malnourished and weighed 1.8 kilograms. Kutupalong, Cox??????s Bazar, Bangladesh. 28th November, 2017. Photo: Kate GeraghtyBangkok: An international Rohingya crisis appeal has raised $278 million to help deal with one of the world’s worst humanitarian emergencies, but that is less than half the amount experts say is needed.
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United Nations and international aid agencies have appealed for $562 million to assist 1.2 million people, including Rohingya people living in sprawling refugee camps and Bangladeshis affected by the crisis.

Aid workers are scaling up their distribution of shelter and non-food items as winter takes hold in the camps.

Health workers are also widening vaccination programs in response to the rapid spread of diseases, including highly contagious diphtheria.

More than 655,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled Myanmar’s Rakhine state since August 25, the day the country’s army launched systematic attacks on Rohingya villages in what the United Nations calls “text-book ethnic cleansing” and “very likely” crimes against humanity.

Survivors have told of atrocities including organised rape, torching of villages and the slaughter and burning of children.

In Australia, an appeal for funds in conjunction with the Australian Red Cross and the refugee agency UNHCR has raised millions which are being matched dollar for dollar by the Australian government in a campaign supported by Fairfax Media and the ABC.

The Australian Red Cross Myanmar Crisis appeal has raised almost $4 million, including the government’s contribution.

Jess Letch, the Red Cross’s disaster and crisis response manager, said money raised goes towards “providing healthcare for those who are sick and injured, running our field hospitals and mobile health clinics, ensuring families are able to access clean water and sanitation, providing essential relief items, as well as psychological support for those who need it.”

Ian Woolverton from Save the Children said “so far we have raised over $500,000, which is a great effort.”

“The needs are massive with children and families living in the most appalling conditions,” he said.

Oxfam has raised about $300,000.

“Humanitarian support for the Rohingya refugees has not been able to keep pace with the scale of the crisis and needs to be urgently increased,” said Oxfam Australia’s Chief Executive Dr Helen Szoke.

“With the crisis likely to go on for years, it is now time for donors to support longer term needs.”

The Australian government has pledged $30 million of its more than $3 billion-a-year overseas aid budget for the Rohingya crisis, which includes up to $5 million to match money raised.

The government is also supporting the delivering of programs by Care Australia, Caritas Australia, Oxfam, Plan International Australia, Save the Children Australia and World Vision Australia.

Foreign Minister Julie Bishop said “I urge the Australian public to give generously. Your support will help to deliver life-saving assistance to those caught-up in this crisis.”

To donate to a national appeal launched by Australian charities, visit 梧桐夜网dfat.gov419论坛/jointappeal

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An artist’s impression of the proposed Lingard Private Hospital building in Merewether. The paint is barely dryon Lingard Private Hospital’s newest building and the Merewether health care provider already haslodged plans foranother extension.
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The hospital submitted a development application this month to Newcastle City Council to build a $13 million, three-storey annex on the corner of Lingard and Merewether streets.

If approved, the new building will comprise four operating theatres, 17 consulting rooms and three levels of car park, two of them underground, providing 129 parking spaces.

The building exceeds height and floor-space-ratio limits for the area, but Lingard’s DA argues the structure does not unduly affect neighbouring properties and provides “essential infrastructure and high-quality health services”.

The council will refer the development application to the Hunter and Central Coast Joint Regional Planning Panel for determination.

Lingard was built in the early 1970s as a nursing home before morphing into a surgical hospital in 1981.

Ramsay Health Care sold it in 2006 to Healthe Care Australia, which has embarked on about $50 million inextensions and upgrades in the past 10 years.

The site of the latest addition to Lingard hospital.

Lingard was largely rebuilt in a $24 million project in 2011, and a new $15 million, two-storey section opened this year at the western end of the hospital.The western addition was planned at three storeys, 50 per cent more than the height limit, but was reduced to two after residents complained.

The 2600 square metre site of the latest extension is across the road fromTownson Oval andadjoins a modern church in Lingard Street and a smash repair shop in Merewether Street.

The new building would exceed the block’s 10-metre height limit by six metres and almost double the maximum floor-space ratio set out in planning regulations.

Meanwhile, developerGTS Unit Trust hasamended its DA for the heritage-listed Hamilton Fire Station in Belford Street.

Plans for the site includefive new townhouses on a car park and lawn at the rear of the station, but a proposal for a sixth dwelling inside the station has been dropped.

The amended plan for Hamilton Fire Station.

The latest plans also amend the townhouse design and alter a fence adjoining the fire station after residents complained about the development’s impact on the heritage value of the area and the station.

The station was built in the 1920s and still in use until Fire and Rescue NSW moved to new headquarters at Lambton in July 2016.

The site sold for $1.96 million in November last year.

The council is also assessing a development application for a 14-storey, $8.5millionresidential tower at 811-815 Hunter Street, near Dairy Farmers Corner.

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All rounder: Rachel Kim of One Tree Espresso at Charlestown Square, Charlestown. Picture: Jonathan CarrollOne Tree Coffee, Shop 201, Level 2, Charlestown Square, Mon-Wed: 8am-5pm, Thu: 8am-8pm, Fri-Sat: 8am-5pm, Sun: 9am-4pm.
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With so many of us exhausting ourselves at our nearest and largest shopping centres at this time of year, it is an enduring oddity that so few of these house quality coffee outlets. Most of the espresso available in these enormous malls comes from franchises that are more about speed and convenience than a memorable cup of distinctive flavours. Whilst they might call your order a double shot latte, it rarely tastes anything like what your local barista pours you around the corner.

One Tree Espresso at Charlestown Square prides itself on being an exception to this rule. There may be nothing artisanal or trendy about the appearance of this café but the coffee and the food proves that there doesn’t need to be. Order a double shot here and you can expect to see latte art that would prompt at least a few Newcastle baristas to rush back to work and clean out their steam wands.

Underneath the perfect rosetta pattern on my flat white ($4) was a smooth and richly textured coffee brimming with subtle caramel flavours.

If you’re chasing a quicker hit with a short black ($3.50) their single origin this month hails from Guatemala and is concentrated with every sharp and citric flavour you would want from a mildly roasted espresso.

If your tastes sit at the sweeter end of the coffee spectrum, they even blend their mochas ($5) with a special Lindt milk chocolate that is every bit as memorable as the rest of the beverage selection.

Unlike almost all of their nearby coffee competitors, One Tree offers a refreshing cold brew ($5.50) that goes down a treat over the summer months. If you are still unfamiliar with this fashionable method of making, it basically involves leaving coarsely ground coffee in cold water over a period of at least 12 hours so that the more bitter, espresso-like flavours can mellow themselves out. The single origin cold brew at One Tree is one of the better ones I have tasted. Left to brew for at least 14hours using the widely loved Toddy brewing system, theirs is a smooth and thirst-quenching coffee delight.

From the kitchen comes even more delicious surprises. Their famous Guinea toastie ($10) is layered with blackened chicken, pecorino and fresco cheeses, a corn salsa and a sriracha aioli. The Penny ($10) is packed with double smoked ham, cheddar, rocket, mustard and a tomato chilli jam. The vegetarian Herbie ($9) that I sampled comes with stacks of seasoned pumpkin, grilled haloumi, chilli jam and rocket. Even with a small army of hungry Christmas shoppers seated at their tables, it arrived almost as quickly as my coffee and was just as satisfying.

Quick, convenient and of a better quality than at least a couple of the cafés around my nearest corner.

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Bangkok: As staunchly Islamic Achenese bulldozed mass graves for the victims of the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami, the only explanation they could come up with was “inshallah”- it is God’s will.
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A tsunami, the height of coconut trees, had swept across Asia’s shores and no-one could be blamed for one of the world’s worst natural disasters.

Thirteen years later, survivors of Asia’s worst calamity since then are documenting acts of almost unspeakable barbarity committed by Myanmar’s military in Rakhine State.

And the generals are literally getting away with murder, so far.

There has been plenty of outrage across the world but little punitive action has been taken against them.

Denunciation by UN agencies and human rights groups – and much global hand wringing – seems an acceptable price to pay for forcing the Rohingya population from their homelands.

To be sure, Myanmar’s transition to democracy is at a critical crossroad.

Australia and most other countries have resisted calls for imposing new sanctions on the Myanmar military believing it could damage an already parlous economy and push the country back into isolation.

They worry punitive action could undermine the difficult situation facing Aung San Suu Kyi, the country’s civilian de facto leader, who was swept into power on a wave of democratic euphoria at historic elections in 2015.

But she has become the military’s chief apologist, mocking a “huge iceberg of misinformation” and rejecting reports of sexual abuse against women as “fake news”.

Only the United States has moved to impose new sanctions on those responsible for the Rohingya atrocities, singling out Myanmar General Maung Maung Soe, who was in-charge of troops in Rakhine.

But at the same time the US has invited the Myanmar military to take part as formal observers, with Australia, in a major multinational military exercise next year, led by the US and Thailand.

Australia is resisting growing calls to cut the Australian Defence Force’s support and training for the Myanmar military, known as Tatmadaw.

The ADF released to Fairfax Media details of its defence engagement program with Myanmar, which includes 22 Tatmadaw members training or studying in Australia, paid for by Australia taxpayers.

The ADF provides support in non-combat areas, including humanitarian assistance, disaster relief and peacekeeping, it said.

An ADF spokesperson told Fairfax Media Australia’s “limited engagement” with Myanmar is to “encourage positive change through engagement.”

The spokesperson added that the maintenance of lines of communication with Myanmar’s military “provides a mechanism as required to influence behaviour and address the challenging situation in Rakhine State.”

I don’t buy it.

Those responsible for these atrocities must be held accountable if we are not to lose faith in humanity.

Myanmar’s generals have for decades ignored international condemnation of their treatment of Rohingya, who have been denied basic rights, including citizenship in Buddhist-majority Myanmar.

International sanctions and pressure matter to the generals because that is what led to them to end half a century of iron-fist rule and allow democratic elections.

Without being held to account, they will be free to continue their barbaric treatment of Rohingya and other ethnic minorities in the country.

The Turnbull government’s reaction to the Rohingya crisis has been feeble. Foreign Minister Bishop Julie Bishop has pledged $30 million of Australia’s more than $3 billion-a-year overseas aid budget and sent aid experts to Bangladesh, to where more than 800,000 Rohingya have fled.

Last week she announced Australia would deploy a team of medical experts to survey health needs following an outbreak of deadly and highly contagious diphtheria in the camps, months after experts warned of a looming health catastrophe.

Bishop should go to Bangladesh to see for herself how the Rohingya are struggling just to survive in horrific conditions, and hear some of the harrowing accounts of atrocities, including the slaughter of babies and mass rape.

She could be the first high-profile politician from a foreign country to go into the camps, sending a blunt message to Myanmar that the world will not stand idly by as the Rohingya are exterminated.

Bishop may then come to see that Australia should take the lead as a regional power to ramp up pressure on Myanmar, including as a first step, ending the ADF’s support for the country’s generals.

梧桐夜网dfat.gov419论坛/jointappeal

Fairfax Media ???South-East Correspondent Lindsay Murdoch and Photographer Kate Geraghty visited the Rohingya camps in Bangladesh last month.

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